Blog July 2020

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Posted On: July 09, 2020
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TAKING YOUR DOG ONBOARD?

Posted On: July 09, 2020

Taking your canine buddy on your boating adventures guarantees more fun for all.

BASED ON AN ARTICLE BY JESSICA STONE

With a little planning, you and your four-legged crew can have great fun on the water.

Here are six simple tips to help your pooch feel safe, comfortable, and happy on your boat.

  1. Dogs, like people, can get seasick. Hide a capsule of powdered ginger in a chunk of cheese to settle a queasy stomach. Doggy ginger snaps are an effective treat that help to prevent mal-de-mer while doubling as a reward for great behavior.
  2. If your dog swims in saltwater, take a moment to give her/him a freshwater rinse at the end of the day. Pay attention to The paws. Salt irritates the webbing between dogs' toes and may cause cracking or bleeding.
  3. Dogs are safer if they're wearing a life jacket onboard, and easier to rescue. Avoid the styles with only one or two straps, as they can be unstable and pinch or cut skin. Select a style with full coverage under the belly to provide greater protection, and increased buoyancy.
  4. To lift large or elderly dogs aboard, consider a Rappel Sling. Designed to lower rescue dogs into remote areas, these heavy-duty slings attach easily to hardware on your boat. They will reduce strain on your back, protect your pet, and can be used to lift other heavy items on board as well.
  5. Train your dog to poop on a square of Astroturf on deck. Always keep the grass in the same spot so she understands that this is an OK place. Add a grommet to a corner of the turf and thread a line through it for easy rinsing. Solid materials should be collected and disposed of properly ashore.
  6. You can save the work of toting dog chow down the dock each weekend by storing kibble on board in an airtight plastic box. Add several bay leaves to the dry food to deter bugs. Remove the leaves before feeding your pet.
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LEARNING THE LINGO OF BOATING

Posted On: July 07, 2020

Marine terminology may sound like old, archaic jargon to some, but there are good reasons why it's important to use the right words aboard a boat.

Let's start with the most important four terms.

The front of a boat is called the "bow," and the back is the "stern."

"Starboard" refers to what is the right side of the boat if you're facing the bow; "port" refers to what is the left side if you're facing the bow. (To remember this, note that "port" and "left" each have four letters.)

So why don't we just say front, back, left, and right?

The answer is that the starboard side is ALWAYS the starboard side, no matter which way you, or anyone else, is facing on board. This is important. Imagine that you're on a boat and the captain asks you to quickly put fenders over the right side. If you were facing one another, would that be your right or his? Or imagine it's getting dark, or heavy weather is upon you, and you can't see which way people are facing on the boat. Saying "It's to your left!" or "Look to the right!" would make no sense to anyone and would create confusion that could threaten the crew and boat. If someone yells, "Man overboard! Port side!" clear directions and the use of accurate terms could mean the difference between locating, or losing sight of, a victim.

"Gunwale" (pronounced GUNN-ell) is the edge of the boat where the hull meets the deck; the name is derived from the lip at the edge of the deck that at one time prevented cannons from sliding into the sea as the ship rolled. The toilet on a boat is called the "head," which gets its name from its traditional location in the head, or forepart, of the ship. Cabins and other compartments within the boat are divided from each other by "bulkheads" (walls), which are vertical partitions between the cabin "sole" (floor) and the underside of the deck that provide structural stability to the boat's design.

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7 TIPS FOR EASY OIL CHANGES

Posted On: July 01, 2020

7 Tips For Easier Oil Changes

  • Always warm the engine before changing the oil.
  • Use a closed oil-changing system whenever possible. It's simple to use, reduces the chance of spills, and makes it easier to transport used oil to a recycling facility.
  • When changing your engine's oil filter, wrap the filter with a thick cloth during removal to avoid burning your hands. Write the date and engine hours on the new filter to serve as a visual reminder of when the next oil change is due.
  • Use oil-absorbent pads and containers to prevent and contain accidental spills.
  • Temporarily disable automatic bilge pumps to prevent oil from accidentally being pumped overboard in the event of a spill.
  • Recycle used oil and filters.
  • Dispose of used absorbent pads and rags properly.


Always contain and dispose of waste fluids properly. Store waste fluids separately. Mixing fluids can make recycling impossible and create a veritable Hell's Broth that's even more toxic (and difficult) to dispose of. Your marina likely has a disposal or recycling program available for waste oil but may not have such a program for transmission fluid. There are other options; for instance, many automotive-parts stores maintain separate stations for recycling transmission fluid

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